Soul of the Northwest

BigLeaf maple

 

Big leaf maple,  Acer macrophyllum,

leaves shine sugar coated.

Alive in a hundred shades of green,

I am the Northwest, soul of the planet.

Catch a raindrop.

Tip your chin up.

Drink sky water.

Splash into the lake.

Mystery lies in downward clouds.

Wait for the midnight owl.

C.J. Prince

Copyright 2016

 

Aperture

 

just-hand-and-sun

 

She opens her hand

catching sunlight.

The lines of her palm—

life, love and fortune—

different than the day

before.

 

Star patterns change,

Water ripples change.

Now changes in her heart.

A gate opens for peace.

C.J. Prince

©2016

Spin the Wheel

cross-quarter-days

 

Summer Sister dances,

a flighty faerie step, arms

outstretched to the universes.

She pulls down spiral threads

to honor Lugh’s mother,

connects webs from her fingertips

along the wheel of the year,

Lughnassahd to Equinox,

Samhain to Yule.

We are the amusement park

of watching stars.

C.J. Prince

©2016cross-quarter-days

Darkness of Sorrow

purple hyacinth

Darkness of Sorrow

 

I am the scent of purple hyacinth,

the mist courting moon,

an unfurled floribunda.

 

I am the blue of lake

sucked into heaven,

the memory of withered amaryllis.

Like the moon, I shine

even when you can’t see me.

C.J. Prince

©2016

PEACE POEMS POSTCARD MONTH

white-dove-flying-picture-hd-desktop-wallpapers

Leap Into Peace in 2016

See facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/worldpeacepoets

REGISTER:  e-mail address: worldpeacepoets@gmail.com

SIGN-UP for February Peace Poetry Postcard Month.

2016 has an extra day for Peace!

JOIN poets from around the world (29 to a group) and send one of your original peace poems on a postcard for the 29 days of February.

SIGN UP at worldpeacepoets@gmail.com and you will become part of a group of 29 who promise to send new poems on peace to each other.

To SIGN UP use the subject line: Peace Postcards

In the body of the e-mail provide:

Your Name, Street Address, City, State, Country and Zip or Postal Code.

For every 29 poets who sign up, a group is formed.

You will receive an e-mail with you list as soon as your group reaches 29 names and addresses.

PROCESS:

On the first day of February (or before) write an original poem on the post card of your choice and send it to the person whose name is listed below your name. Proceed down the list sending a new post card every day. Circle back to the top of the list until you come back to your own name.

It’s that easy!

Postage: From the U.S. International postage is 1.20 per card or 4 first class forever stamps.

PROMPTS! Original poems of peace can be inspired by a postcard you have received or by a prompt listed  World Peace Poets on Facebook.  You can sign up any time.

POST! Feel welcome to post your peace poem on our Facebook page if you wish and give peace a jump start ( leap ahead) in 2016!

“Mother, May I?”

I am so delighted to tell you that my new poetry book “Mother, May I?” is now available at amazon.com. You need to put in both the title and my name to bring up the link. When there are enough hits, it should come up readily with either. For now, use both. Thank you all for your energy in my life.

Mother May I v3a (1)

Ruba’i of Expectation

4.18.14        NaPoWriMo PROMPT:  Our prompt (optional, as always). Today I challenge you to write a ruba’i. What’s that? Well, it’s a Persian form — multipe stanzas in the ruba’i form are a rubaiyat, as in The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam. Basically, a ruba’i is a four-line stanza, with a rhyme scheme of AABA. Robert Frost’s famous poem Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening uses this rhyme scheme. You can write a poem composed of one ruba’i, or try your hand at more, for a rubaiyat. Happy writing!

Image

 

Ruba’i of Expectation

Always exists with never—

a place without ever—

where change will not die.

Lost to now, I burn with fever.

 

C.J. Prince

©2014

Eostre Bless Us

4.17.14 NaPoWriMo PROMPT:  Today’s (optional) prompt is to write a poem in which you very specifically describe something in terms of at least three of the five senses. So, for example, your poem could carefully describe the smell of something, the taste of something, and the sound of something. It might be helpful to pick things you have actually encountered during your day: a cup of coffee at the office (“burnt, flat, and joylessly acrid”), or a hyacinth in the neighobr’s yard (“riotously curled petals shading violet-lavender-white, against the dark-green glossy-smooth leaves”). Happy writing!

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Eostre Bless Us

Waft of incense, a smoky allure of days gone by,

mingles with the dart of garlic simmered.

A suite by Massenet lilts across the room.

The wood burning stove crackles

warding off the chill of wind and rain.

 

Soft light from shaded lamps

and a dim glow of twilight

through slated windows.

There in that fleeting moment,

our bodies pray through clothing,

soft lips when you return home.

 

C.J. Prince

©2014