On a Day like This

cjprinceauthor:

I am honored to know this poet.

Originally posted on Andrew Shattuck McBride, Writer's Blog:

Inspired by lines from Mother Teresa

Exclaim over a day like this, with its high, thin
clouds feathering sky over cerulean sea. Wonder
at seeing over distances so vast. Marvel at its
warming from a slight chill.

Even on a day like this the day (and everything)
can be shattered into millions of pieces,
and the incomprehensible can manifest and destroy
whatever or all we hold close.

Destruction can be capricious and vast
and overpowering. Loss and sorrow can descend
and weigh so heavily that even breathing
can now seem impossible.

What we live for can die… Live anyway.
What we hope for can be denied… Hope anyway.
What we build can be destroyed… Build anyway.
What we love can be taken away… Love anyway.

Exclaim over all days. Welcome this day.
Live. Give thanks. Cherish and remember.
Hope. Volunteer. Help someone. Offer hugs.
Build. Love. Tell those you love…

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By cjprinceauthor

7 Book Layout Errors You Will Want to Avoid

cjprinceauthor:

Always something to learn!

Originally posted on Savvy Writers & e-Books online:

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Joel Friedlander wrote a great article “7 Formatting Errors That Make Your Book Look Unprofessional”, helping self-publishing authors to get to know the in- and outs of book layout. This is not the only useful post, a whole cornucopia of advice for authors who want to create print books can be found on www.TheBookDesigner.com, Joel’s website.  He asks: “Although our books may be self-published, we sure don’t want them to look sub-par, do we?”

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Books Should Look Like from Traditional Publishers

Writers certainly try to launch their books without the long delays or the uncertainty if they get a traditional publisher contract. The best way to have a great book layout is through a professional.  However, some authors don’t want to use a book lay-outer, or don’t want to fork out the costs involved.  Another way to solve a lot of these print book formatting problems…

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By cjprinceauthor

just one word

cjprinceauthor:

Playing with words and meanings. Grammar and punctuation counts!

Originally posted on The Boynton Blog:

only

This little wordplay, which is borrowed from the word-savvy folks at Grammarly (who borrowed and reworked it from curlicuecal), is not only fun but instructive. While not every word has the sense-altering impact of only, the exercise of moving the word through the sentence illustrates the significance of placement and how meaning can be changed by repositioning a single word. Try it with your own writing, not necessarily with the word only, but by shifting just one word through your lines of text to see what happens…

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By cjprinceauthor

Poetry Center Chapbook Exchange

cjprinceauthor:

What do you say?

Originally posted on The Boynton Blog:

  A Project of the Poetry Center, San Francisco State University

When it comes to chapbooks, the definition seems as variable as the poetry they contain. Here’s what Brian A. Klems at Writer’s Digest has to say about chapbooks. (The term chapbook apparently comes from chap(man) book, because such publications were once peddled by an itinerant tradesman known as a chapman, with word origins related to cheap.)

However you describe them, chapbooks offer a window into a poet’s most recent, and sometimes most experimental, work. The challenge, unless you live in a city large enough to support a bookstore that stocks a wide selection of poetry chapbooks, such as City Lights in San Francisco or Open Books in Seattle, is to see chapbooks outside the context of poetry readings.

Melissa Eleftherion Carr, a Mendocino County (CA) librarian, and Elise Ficarra, associate director of the Poetry Center, San Francisco State University, are starting to…

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Meet Writer C. J. Prince

Originally posted on shannon p. laws | writer:

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C.J. Prince, Author and Poet

The first thing I thought when I met C. J. about two years ago was “Who are you and how do I get to know you more?”  Love at first sight you might say.  Her colorful personality, bubbling energy and big smile are completely addicting.

This August she released her new poetry book “Mother, May I”.   Reviews are already out:

“A brilliant, intricately woven rendition of stigmas, family rules, love and pain that stains the soul.”  ~Una Bruhns, Poet, Creative Writer, Vancouver, BC, Canada

“…In this autobiographical collection abounding in images from BB guns to drowned kittens, the shadow cast by her mother, “born too early for the age of Aquarius,” inhabits the pages either as a bodily presence, a memory, or as a ghost who is “not here” but “everywhere…” ~Paul Fisher, Bellingham, Washington, author of Rumors of Shore


 

Congratulations on the release of…

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CREEKSIDE OPEN MIC

There was a nip of fall in the air.  Three golden leaves fell at my feet as I walked to the Community Center for the first ever Creekside Open Mic in Sudden Valley.  Too soon, says one.  Oh, for rain, sighs another.  Seasons change as something new begins.

Carol McMillan, poet and author, conceived of the idea and in the next moment it was happening.  Many poets drove from Bellingham to perform, including Elizabeth Cardarelli, Sam Bouic and Jim Milstead.  Local poets included yours truly.  Laurel Leigh performed a riveting short story.  Sudden Valley residents turned out with enthusiasm.

Creekside Open Mic will meet the third Wednesday of the month from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.

By cjprinceauthor

Writing Solo, Publishing with the village.

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 Peachy Prince

The Muse swirls in, her rainbow scarfs shimmering.  

She whispers and is gone.  Catch it if I can.

That’s the solo part of writing.  The inhaling of words, the exhaling through the pen.

Collecting them, reading them, refining them, that all begins to engage the village.

Once I decide to publish some of the poems, I am helpless without the assistance

of others.  I am so grateful to all who helped me launch “Mother, May I?”

By cjprinceauthor